How to Use Extension Control Training Mode

Data is awesome, but too much data can sometimes be overwhelming. Sometimes you just need a couple of metrics and a clear goal.

That’s why we have created an entirely new training mode “Extension Control” with a singular focus on working on clubface control during backswing and downswing.

The new training mode provides data so you can practice 2 things:

  1. Get in a good backswing position with a stable clubface
  2. Achieve a powerful impact position like a tour player
 

What is Extension Control

Diagram of wrist extension and flexion

Extension Control is a special training mode focused only on training the correct extension pattern.

Controlling extension is key to managing your shot direction since your extension is responsible for the opening/closing of the clubface.

The main goal of this practice mode is to learn how to not add too much extension during the backswing and then remove the extension during the downswing.

To get started, simply select “Extension Control” in the Home screen.

We have developed two new metrics that will help you:

Backswing Metric: How much extension was added from address to the top of the backswing.

Downswing Metric: How much extension was added from address to impact.

The training mode also measures extension data for these three main swing positions:

  • Address
  • Top
  • Impact

We will explain the metrics later on in this post.

How to use the Backswing Metric

“Backswing” measures how much extension you have added from the address position to the top of the backswing.

In the example above the Backswing metric is -3 degrees.

Which is calculated as follows:

Extension at the Top – Extension at Address = 34 deg. – 37 deg. = -3 degrees

The more positive the number, the more extension you added.

The more negative the number, the more extension you removed.

The more extension you add, the more you open the clubface. If the clubface is very open it is difficult to consistently close the clubface during the downswing.

So good players control the clubface by controlling their extension and keeping it stable.

Suggested range:

Typically tour players keep their extension at the top similar to what they had at address or are a bit less extended.

The average range is from -10 (less extended) to +5 (more extended).

Individual numbers might be different.

How to use the Downswing Metric

“Downswing” measures how much extension you have removed from the address position to impact.

In the example above the Downswing metric is -12 degrees.

Which is calculated as follows:

Extension at the Impact – Extension at Address = 25 deg. – 37 deg. = -12 degrees

The more negative the number, the more extension was removed. The more extension is removed, the more the wrist is flexed (bowed) compared to address and the club is more delofted. The more negative number the more shaft lean at impact.

Suggested range:

Typically tour players are -15 to -30 less extended at impact than they were at address position. Amateurs are often only -5 less extended.

When to Use Extension Control

You should use extension control in these three cases:

  1. You are adding too much extension and opening the clubface during the backswing. In most cases, this happens when you add too much extension during the backswing and the “backswing metric” in this case will be positive. You should work on decreasing the “backswing metric”.
  2. If you are struggling with too much flipping through impact and too high ball flight. Then you should focus on the “downswing metric” make sure that it is negative, somewhere in the range of -30 to -15 degrees.
  3. In the case when you have too much flexion during the backswing.  Often this is a problem for players with weaker wrists (often female golfers). They remove too much extension during the backswing, they bow the wrist too much. In these cases the “backswing metric” will be too negative, for example, -50 degrees. Then you should focus on getting it closer to zero, and try to keep a stable extension during the backswing.

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