Learning centeR

Wrist Alignment for Correct Use of the Bounce in Pitching

If there is just one skill in short game a player should learn, then consistent contact is the most important one. Without consistent contact distance control becomes impossible. But how to achieve it?

The secret to consistent short game is using the bounce (sole of the club) correctly. The bounce helps to prevent digging in of the lead edge of the club and increases the forgiveness of the wedge. As Titleist wedge designer Bob Vokey says “the bounce is your friend!”. But how to swing the club to correctly to use the bounce? The key is using the lead wrist extension (cupping) correctly.

If the lead wrist is too bowed (flexed) the club face becomes too shut, the leading edge is too exposed and the player has very high risk of either hitting ground before the ball or pulling the shot left.

Watch the video (3 minutes) below to learn how to use HackMotion sensor to learn correct wrist alignment to expose the bounce.

Learning Correct Wrist Alignment in Pitching

Extension(+)/Flexion(-)

Using Data to Improve Pitching Technique

Let’s take a look at 3D wrist data to better evaluate the difference between 2 different pitching motions and progress made when changing a player’s pitching technique.

Graph 1 shows poor wrist data of a player with POOR pitching technique. Green line shows wrist extension, also known as cupping (positive value) and flexion, also known as bowing (negative value)

  1. The player who holds too much lead wrist flexion through impact and does not release it.
  2. Too much lead wrist flexion means the player is not using the bounce of the club correctly.
  3. without using the bounce the lead edge of the club is digging in the ground and player is hitting pitch shots with poor contact.

 

Graph 2 shows poor wrist data of a player with GOOD pitching technique. Green line shows wrist extension, also known as cupping (positive value) and flexion, also known as bowing (negative value)

  1. The player releases wrist extension through impact, he allows the wrist to extend/cup.
  2. Allowing wrist to extend  means the player is using the bounce of the club correctly.
  3. Instead of the lead edge of the club is digging in the ground and the bounce will slide along the turf, allowing golfers to hit shots even if the turf is contacted slightly before the ball.

Want to get started?

Step 1: Get HackMotion and start understanding the different release patterns.

Step 2: Learn from included Tour data. 

Step 3: Measure and improve to get the wrists exactly as needed for more controlled ball flight.

Choose Your HackMotion

Learn More About Wrist Angles

STEP UP YOUR GAME -
GET YOUR HACKMOTION NOW!

The 3 tour wrist patterns

WATCH OUR EXCLUSIVE video:

Get the LATEST COACH EDUCATION IN GOLF

This video will change how you see the role of wrist angles! Sign up via email and learn how top coaches use modern golf technology.

We use cookies to ensure you get the best experience on our website.