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Pitching and Chipping – Scott Cowx

Lead wrist mechanics in pitching and chipping

Club face control is crucial for great short game and small movements at the wrist level can be decisive. As the HackMotion sensor allows to detect even the slightest movements, it is a great tool to understand the details of wrist mechanics in the short game.

To learn more about wrist mechanics in short game, watch this presentation by Scott Cowx (PGA of Canada Teacher of the Year) and then explore various pitching and chipping shots with wrist graphs and explanations added. 

Watch the webinar by Scott Cowx (37 min)

In this presentation, at first, Scott explains how he as a coach approaches the short game technique. Then the lead wrist motion in various pitching and chipping shots is explained.

Continue by exploring lead wrist mechanics of the 9 pitching and chipping shots demonstrated by Scott Cowx.

The terminology used:

    • Extension (+)/Flexion (-)  (green line) = Cupping/Bowing of the lead wrist
    • Radial(+)/Ulnar (-) deviation (blue line) = Cocking/Uncocking of the lead wrist
    • Rotation  = Global Rotation rotation is measured relative to the address position.
      Global supination of lead forearm is palm UP rotation and the graph line move in positive (+) direction, it is closing the clubface.
      Global pronation of lead forearm is palm DOWN rotation and makes the graph line move in negative (-) direction, it is opening the clubface.

Extension(+)/Flexion(-)

Radial(+)/Ulnar(-) Deviation

Global supination (+) / global pronation (-)

1. Lead Wrist Flexion – Bump and Run

In this swing Scott is pushing the lead wrist towards flexion (bowing) in the backswing on purpose.  At impact, flexion decreases as a natural body response. Follow the green line in the graph to track extension (+)/flexion (-).

2. Lead Wrist Stable Extension – Mid High Pitch

In this swing Scott tries to keep stable extension amount (cupping) through the backswing. Prior to impact there is a slight movement towards flexion (although the wrist remains extended). After impact wrist extension increases, as well as radial deviation.

3. Lead Wrist Increasing Extension – High Flop

In this High Flop swing, Scott adds more wrist extension (cupping) towards the top of the backswing. Similar to previous shots, there is a slight movement towards flexion at impact (although the wrist remains extended). After the impact – rehinge is quicker as wrist extension increases, as well as radial deviation.

4. Reverse Overlap Putting Grip – Poor Man’s Flop Shot 

This is a shot Scott uses often, as there is less wrist movement and the shot is easy to repeat.
The lead wrist has a stable extension throughout the backswing, just slightly moving towards flexion. At impact there is an early movement toward extension.

5. 50 yd – 9000+ rpm low spinner

In this shot, the lead wrist has a stable extension throughout the backswing, just slightly moving towards flexion. Note the rotation (purple line in the graph): supination of the wrist at impact to square the clubface.

6. Abraham Ancer 30 yd Chop Spinner

In this shot, the key movement happens with radial/ulnar deviation (blue line in the graph).  The lead wrist goes abruptly into radial deviation (cocking) in backswing. Prior to impact there is a steep, sharp ulnar movement. 
Extension is stable throughout the backswing, but flexion is increasing through impact and after it. 

7. Seve Ballesteros 7 Finger Shot 

In this shot last 3 fingers of the left hand are let go when aproching impact.  
The lead wrist goes into flexion at the top, but prior to impact it is reversed rapidly and extension increases. 

8. Recoil Flop

The Recoil Flop can be used to softly get the ball onto the green.
After a relatively big backswing, stop the left hand abruptly before impact. 
That causes the wrist extension amount to increase quickly, and the club slides underneath the ball rapidly.

9. Ryo Ishikawa 3000 – Split Hand Reverse Left Hand Flop

The left hand is flipped over.
Prior to impact wrist goes from radial deviation to ulnar due to the reverse hand placement. 
Extension of the lead wrist is stable throughout the backswing, but flexion is increasing through impact and after it. 

 

Ready to Try HackMotion Sensor?

  • HackMotion sensor is used by world’s leading coaches – Phil Kenyon, Allen Terrell, Scott Cowx, Mark Blackburn, David Orr, Brian Manzella, Mike Schy and many others. Join the rank of the most the educated coaches.
  • PGA Tour winners Dustin Johnson, Bryson Dechambeau, Brad Faxon and European Tour winners Thorbjorn Olesen, Lucas Bjerregaard and many others have used it to measure and optimize their wrist motion.
  • Access tour player data and compare your data against it. Find out your release pattern and optimize your performance.
  • Audio feedback helps to fix common swing faults – too much wrist cupping (extension) in full swing causing open club face and inconsistent wrist angles in your putting stroke.

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