Clubface Control Drills and Audio Feedback

Many golfers have heard the phrase “Feel ain’t real” – even when we think that we’re doing a particular motion, in reality we might be doing something completely different.

Let’s say that after a few swings you notice that you tend to extend your wrist too much at the top. You can decrease your extension through drills and constant feedback from HackMotion, which will tell you whether or not you’re doing the drills correctly.

What is the “motorcycle move?”

By studying tour players’ wrist motion we see that they do something a little different from most amateur golfers. Many of them flex the lead wrist with a motion similar to a “motorcycle move” and get the clubface square to the target line earlier. This allows them to hit more solid and powerful shots. 

At the top of the backswing, take your lead hand and pretend it is no longer on a golf grip but on a motorcycle grip. Feel the knuckles of your lead hand turn clockwise as you start your downswing (counter-clockwise for a left-handed player). This will give you the feeling of closing the clubface earlier in your downswing. If you turn your knuckles but don’t keep rotating your body, you will hook the golf ball or start the ball well left of your target because the clubface will be too shut at impact. If you turn your body but don’t knuckle down enough, you will hit it to the right.

3 HackMotion Biofeedback Drills

Let’s look at some examples of faults a player might want to fix in their full swing.

Problem 1: You tend to cup the lead wrist (add too much extension) at the top and open the clubface too much.

Problem 2: You tend to cup (extend) your wrist during the downswing.

Problem 3: You tend to flip your wrists adding extension before impact which causes poor contact and inconsistent swings.

Drill 1: Get rid of cupped lead wrist at the top and close the clubface.

1. Set the real-time biofeedback to make a sound when your lead wrist extension is inside the suggested range. We see that typical tour players are inside the range of +5 degrees more extended to -10 degrees more flexed at the top relative to their address position.

2. Take a few swings and measure your address position. Based on this address position you can calculate your range at the top. If you are +20 degrees at address, set the range at +10 to +25 degrees.

3. Slowly practice getting your top position in this range. Once you are in the range you will hear audio feedback from the app. Try to get a feel for the correct motion for where your wrists should be.

Drill 2: Get rid of cupped wrist during the downswing.

1. Set the real-time biofeedback to make a sound when your lead wrist extension is inside the suggested range. We see that typical tour players are inside the range of +5 degrees more extended to -10 degrees more flexed at the top relative to their address position. You can add more flexion if you wish to be more flexed.

2. Take a few swings and measure your address position. Based on this address position, you can calculate your range in transition. If you are +20 degrees at address, set the range at +10 to +25 degrees.

3. Take a practice swing, and when your hands are at shoulder height during the downswing, dynamically move inside the range so the biofeedback sounds keeps playing.  

Drill 3: Get rid of extension before impact.

1. Set the real-time biofeedback to make a sound when your lead wrist extension is inside the suggested range. We see that typical tour players are -30 to -15 degrees more flexed at the impact relative to their address position.

2. Take a few swings and measure your address position. Based on this address position, you can calculate your range in transition. If you are +20 degrees at address, set the range at +5 to -10 degrees.

3. Take a short backswing to a 9 o’clock position and really flex (bow) your lead wrist, so the audio signal is playing. Then hit the ball and keep the signal playing.

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